IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Half of UK millennials exposed to domestic abuse in childhood

~ Long-term impact affects mental health, education, and relationships ~

Read our Key Findings

Wednesday 22nd May 2019:

A new poll published by domestic abuse charity Hestia highlights the devastating impact of domestic abuse on young people. The data by Opinium found that almost half of 18-34-year-olds (47%) reported witnessing a parent being a victim of domestic abuse as a child in comparison to 28% of 35-54-year olds and 17% of 55+ year olds.

Millennials who had witnessed domestic abuse as a child said the experience had long-term consequences for them and led to: 

  • 59% experiencing anxiety, depression or PTSD
  • 55% having trust issues in relationships
  • 42% having experienced exclusion from school or low academic performance
  • 34% having self-medicated with alcohol or substance misuse
  • 27% experiencing low attainment in their employment

A third of Millennials affected by domestic abuse as children also believed the exposure to domestic abuse affected their siblings, with their ability to forge successful relationships being impacted the most (26%). A previous report by Pro Bono Economics for Hestia found failure to support children exposed to domestic violence costs UK taxpayers up to £1.4bn. This is made up of up to £70m for Health & Adult Social Care, up to £110m for crime, up to £790m for education and up to £460m for foster and residential care.

Lyndsey Dearlove, Head of Hestia’s domestic abuse campaign, UK SAYS NO MORE:

“Children have long been forgotten as victims of domestic abuse. The data reveals the urgent need for specialist support for children as the long-term impact of domestic abuse can shape a person’s life. The new Domestic Abuse Bill could create a monumental shift in society’s response to domestic abuse and allow all those experiencing domestic abuse access to vital services to break the cycle of abuse. We must not fail another generation”  

The polling strengthens UK SAYS NO MORE’s demands for the Government to enshrine specialist support for children in the Domestic Abuse Bill. So far children have been omitted from the Bill despite 50% of children who experienced domestic abuse as a child becoming a victim later in life.

The campaign, backed by 140 MPs and Lords, is calling for the new Domestic Abuse Bill to:  

  1. Recognise children in the definition of domestic abuse
  2. Give children affected by domestic abuse priority access to schools
  3. Ensure child survivors are given special waiting list statusfor all NHS services including Child and Adolescent Mental Health Support (CAMHS).

-ENDS-

Contacts: Josh McLean, Hestia [email protected] | 07845 555 995

Case studies available on request

Notes to editor:

About Hestia:

At Hestia, we support adults and children across London in times of crisis. We are one of the largest providers of domestic abuse refuges in London supporting over 1,900 women and children recover from the trauma of domestic abuse though outreach and IDVA services.

Last year we worked with more than 9,000 people, including victims of modern slavery, women and children who have experienced domestic abuse, young care leavers and older people. From giving someone a home to helping them to get the right mental health support, we support and enable people at the moment of crisis.

Hestia is also the home of UK SAYS NO MORE, a national campaign to raise awareness of domestic abuse and sexual violence across the UK.

Hestia.org

@Hestia1970

About UK SAYS NO MORE:

UK SAYS NO MORE is a national campaign launched to raise awareness of domestic violence and sexual assault across the UK. The campaign was launched by London charity Hestia in 2016. UK SAYS NO MORE seeks to unite and strengthen a diverse community of members of the public and organisations nationwide to actively take a stand against domestic violence and sexual assault under one powerful, visual symbol. The campaign provides open-source tools and resources for individuals and organisations to take action and get involved in ending domestic violence and sexual assault. Together we can challenge the myths and misconceptions around these issues, share resources and information, and ultimately work together to make real positive change.

UKKSAYSNOMORE.org

@UKSAYSNOMORE

About the Opinium:

Opinium Research conducted the study among 2004 UK adults between the 7th – 10th of May 2019. The data has been weighted to be representative of the population. The survey found:

  • A half of UK adults know a victim of domestic abuse
  • Two in seven UK adults say their parent(s) experienced domestic abuse

When you were a child (age 0-18) did either of your parent’s experience any of the following types of domestic abuse?

Total

Male

Female

18-34

35-54

55+

Base: all respondents

2004

978

1026

567

677

761

Verbal (e.g. name calling)

16 %

14 %

18 %

26 %

17 %

8 %

270

110

160

82

111

77

Physical (e.g. Pushing, hitting)

16 %

15 %

16 %

23 %

17 %

9 %

263

115

148

66

111

86

Emotional (e.g. shaming, degrading)

13 %

11 %

16 %

22 %

15 %

6 %

228

86

142

71

95

62

Controlling behaviour (e.g. isolation)

11 %

10 %

13 %

21 %

12 %

4 %

193

77

116

66

87

40

Psychological (e.g. Manipulation)

11 %

9 %

13 %

19 %

11 %

5 %

189

78

111

59

76

54

Financial (e.g. withholding money)

9 %

8 %

10 %

12 %

9 %

6 %

153

64

89

43

59

51

Other (please specify)

0 %

0 %

0 %

0 %

1 %

0 %

5

2

3

0

3

2

N/A neither of my parents experienced any kind of domestic violence

58 %

56 %

60 %

42 %

57 %

71 %

1256

641

615

152

399

705

I don’t know/can’t remember

11 %

12 %

10 %

8 %

12 %

12 %

223

124

99

30

83

110

I prefer not to say

2 %

2 %

2 %

3 %

2 %

0 %

30

14

16

11

15

4

Net: yes

29 %

30 %

29 %

47 %

28 %

17 %

495

230

265

139

185

171

 


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